Fitness Testing

Chapter 2.1 - Components of Fitness

For each component of fitness, it is important that we know how to measure them.

We test fitness to be able to identify any strengths and weaknesses that we may have, and to measure specific components of fitness. The data collected from each of these fitness tests can be compared with national averages.

Please find below all the fitness tests used to measure the ten components of fitness.

Cardiovascular Endurance

Multi-Stage Fitness Test

The Multi-Stage Fitness Test, otherwise known as the 'Bleep' test, is a test that involves a shuttle run that progressively becomes more difficult and is used to measure aerobic endurance.

Equipment Needed: Tape Measure, Cones, Multi-Stage Fitness Test Recording, Speakers

Protocol:

  1. A recording of a series of timed bleeps is played. You have to run 'shuttles' between two lines, 20 metres apart, starting on the first bleep.
  2. Your foot must be on or over the next line when the next bleep sounds.
  3. The time between the bleeps gets shorter as you go through the difficulty levels, so you have to run faster.
  4. If you miss a bleep, you are allowed two further bleeps to catch up. If you miss three bleeps in a row, the level and number of shuttles completed are noted as your final score.
  5. The higher the level and number of shuttles complete, the better your cardiovascular endurance.

12-Minute Cooper Run

The 12-minute cooper run is a simple method of measuring aerobic endurance and provide an estimate of VO2 max.

Equipment Needed: Stopwatch, 400m Track

Protocol:

  1. Run round a track as many times as you can in 12 minutes.
  2. The distance you have run.walked is recorded in metres.

The further it is, the better your cardiovascular endurance.

Muscular Endurance

Sit-Up Test

The Sit-Up test helps to measure the endurance in the abdominal muscles, by measuring the number of sit-ups that an individual can perform in 30 seconds.

Equipment Needed: Stopwatch, Non-Slip Surface

Protocol:

  1. The athlete lies on the mat with the knees bent, feet flat on the floor and their hands on their ears where they must stay throughout the test
  2. The assistant holds the athlete's feet on the ground
  3. The assistant gives the command “GO” and starts the stopwatch
  4. The athlete sits up touching the knees with their elbows, then returns back to the floor and continues to perform as many sit-ups as possible in 30 seconds
  5. The assistant keeps the athlete informed of the time remaining

Press-Up Test

The Press-Up test helps to measure the endurance in the arm muscles, by measuring the number of press-ups that an individual can complete.

Equipment Needed: Non-Slip Surface

Protocol:

  1. The athlete lies on the ground, places their hands by the shoulders and straightens the arms
  2. The athlete lowers the body until the elbows reach 90° and then extends the arms to return to the start position
  3. The athlete continuous this press-up action, with no rest, until they are unable to continue
  4. The assistant counts and records the number of correctly completed press-ups

Muscular Strength

Grip Strength Dynamometer Test

The Grip Dynamometer test is an objective measure of strength, which measures the strength of the handgrip.

Equipment Needed: Grip Dynamometer

Protocol:

  1. The athlete should stand, holding the dynamometer parallel to the side of the body, with the dial facing away from the body.
  2. The athlete should squeeze the handle as hard as possible without moving the arm.
  3. Three attempts are recorded, with a one-minute rest between each attempt.

One Repetition Maximum (1RM)

The One Repetition Maximum test measures the maximum strength of the chest muscle groups and is based on the maximum weight that can be moved for one repetition.

Equipment Needed: Barbell & Weights, Bench

Protocol:

  1. The assistant loads the barbell with a weight close to the athlete's one repetition maximum load.
  2. The athlete conducts bench presses until they are unable to continue
  3. The assistant acts as a spotter for the athlete and counts the number of successful bench presses
  4. If the number of bench presses exceeds 10 then the athlete rests for 10 minutes, the assistant increases the barbell weight and the athlete repeats the test
  5. The assistant uses the equations on your right to determine the athlete's 1RM.

Good 1RM scores are mostly agreed to be:

  • Males = 1.25 x Body Weight
  • Females = 0.8 x Body Weight

Speed

30-Metre Sprint Test

The 30m Sprint test measures the athlete's ability to effectively and efficiently build up acceleration, from a standing start or from starting blocks, to maximum speed.

Equipment Needed: Cones, Stopwatch, Flat non-slip surface

Protocol:

  1. The assistant marks out a 30-metre straight section with cones
  2. The athlete starts in their own time and sprints as fast as possible over the 30 metres
  3. The assistant starts the stopwatch on the athlete's 1st-foot strike after starting and stopping the stopwatch as the athlete's torso crosses the finishing line
  4. The test is conducted 3 times
  5. The assistant uses the fastest recorded time to assess the athlete's performance

Agility

Illinois Agility Test

The Illinois Agility test measures the athlete's running agility around a set course.

Equipment Needed: Cones, Stopwatch, Flat non-slip surface, Measuring Tape.

Protocol:

  1. The assistance sets up the course as detailed in the video.
  2. The athlete lies face down on the floor at the “Start” cone
  3. The assistant gives the command “GO” and starts the stopwatch.
  4. The athlete jumps to his/her feet and negotiates the course around the cones following the red line route as shown in the diagram to the finish
  5. The assistant stops the stopwatch and records the time when the athlete passes the “Finish” cone

Balance

Stork Stand Test

The Stork Stand Test measures the athlete's ability to maintain a state of equilibrium (balance) in a static position.

Equipment Needed: Stopwatch, Flat non-slip surface

Protocol:

  1. The athlete stands comfortably on both feet with their hands on their hips
  2. The athlete lifts the right leg and places the sole of the right foot against the side of the left kneecap
  3. The assistant gives the command “GO”, starts the stopwatch and the athlete raises the heel of the left foot to stand on their toes
  4. The athlete is to hold this position for as long as possible
  5. The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete's left heel touches the ground, or the right foot moves away from the left knee
  6. The assistant records the time and the test is repeated but this time the left lef is lifted instead of the right.

Reaction Time

Ruler Drop Test

The Ruler Drop test measures the individuals differences in the speed of reactions.

Equipment Needed: Metre Ruler

Protocol:

  1. The ruler is held by the assistant between the outstretched index finger and thumb of the athlete's dominant hand so that the top of the athlete's thumb is level with the zero-centimetre line on the ruler
  2. The assistant instructs the athlete to catch the ruler as soon as possible after it has been released
  3. The assistant releases the ruler and the athlete catches the ruler between their index finger and thumb as quick as possible
  4. The assistant is to record the distance between the bottom of the ruler and the top of the athlete's thumb where the ruler has been caught.
  5. The test is repeated 2 more times and the average value used in the assessment.

Power

Standing Long Jump Test

The Standing Long Jump test measures the athlete's explosive strength of the leg muscles.

Equipment Needed: Cones, Measure Tape

Protocol:

  1. The athlete places their feet over the edge of the sandpit, crouches down and using the arms and legs jumps horizontally as far as possible landing with both feet into the sandpit
  2. The assistant measures and records the distance from the edge of the sandpit to the nearest impression made by the athlete in the sandpit
  3. The athlete repeats the test 3 times
  4. The assistant uses the longest recorded distance to assess the athlete's leg strength

Vertical Jump Test

The 30m Sprint test measures the athlete's ability to effectively and efficiently build up acceleration, from a standing start or from starting blocks, to maximum speed.

Equipment Needed: Wall, Tape Measure, Chalk

Protocol:

  1. The athlete chalks the end of his/her fingertips
  2. The athlete stands side onto the wall, keeping both feet remaining on the ground, reaches up as high as possible with one hand and marks the wall with the tips of the fingers (M1)
  3. The athlete from a static position jumps as high as possible and marks the wall with the chalk on his fingers (M2)
  4. The assistant measures and records the distance between M1 and M2
  5. The athlete repeats the test 3 times
  6. The assistant calculates the average of the recorded distances and uses this value to assess the athlete's performance

Flexibility

Sit And Reach Test

The Sit and Reach test measures the athlete's lower back and hamstring flexibility.

Equipment Needed: Box, Metre Ruler, Tape

Protocol:

  1. The assistant secures the ruler to the box top with the tape so that the front edge of the box lines up with the 15cm (6 inches) mark on the ruler and the zero end of the ruler points towards the athlete
  2. The athlete sits on the floor with their legs fully extended with the bottom of their bare feet against the box
  3. The athlete places one hand on top of the other, slowly bends forward and reaches along the top of the ruler as far as possible holding the stretch for two seconds
  4. The assistant records the distance reached by the athlete's fingertips (cm)
  5. The athlete performs the test three times
  6. The assistant calculates and records the average of the three distances and uses this value to assess the athlete's performance

Coordination

Wall Throw Test

The Wall Throw test measures the athlete's hand-eye coordination and is often known as the 'alternate hand wall toss test'.

Equipment Needed: Tennis Ball, Stopwatch

Protocol:

  1. The athlete stands two metres away from a smooth wall
  2. The assistant gives the command "GO" and starts the stopwatch
  3. The athlete throws a tennis ball with their right hand against the wall and catches it with the left hand, throws the ball with the left hand and catches it with the right hand. This cycle of throwing and catching is repeated for 30 seconds
  4. The assistant counts the number of catches and stops the test after 30 seconds
  5. The assistant records the number of catches

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Fitness Testing

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